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Welcome to the Walk-In Counselling Society of Edmonton!

WICSOE offers a unique single-session approach to counselling. As a walk-in service, we are able to support individuals, couples and families when they need it most.

We help our clients develop a clear plan of action that recognizes and builds on their own strengths and abilities. Sometimes we refer our clients to other services but, in many cases, a single visit to WICSOE is all our clients need in order to feel better about their situation and take the necessary steps toward positive change. Our single-session counselling is a walk-in service. You’ll be assisted on a first-come, first-serve basis with no appointment necessary. For the best experience possible, we recommend that you contact the Walk-In Counselling Society of Edmonton for hours and counselor availability before coming in.

INSTRUCTIONS TO DONATE: Donate to E4C  Under FUND/DESIGNATION choose Walk-In Counselling Society of Edmonton  Automatic Tax Receipt!


New blog posts

  • April 23, 2015

    Vision is more than seeing 20/20-Psychologist Kim Knull talks about her daughter’s struggle to read

    Vision is a lot more than seeing 20/20, says Jacinta Yeung Up to one in four children have a vision problem unrelated to simple sight: expert CBC News Posted: Apr 21, 2015 2:56 PM MT

    The Alberta Association of Optometrists recommends children get an eye exam every year.

    An under-diagnosed eye problem could be the cause of your child’s temper tantrums and difficulty concentrating in class, says an Edmonton optometrist.

    The problem starts when the eyes aren’t working together as a team, says optometrist Jacinta Yeung.

    “If the eyes aren’t working together, they can be bringing in different pieces of information and then the brain has to sort through two different pieces of information.”

    Kim Knull, a registered psychologist and mother of a 6-year-old girl with the condition, says her daughter’s problem first became evident when she entered Kindergarten.

    Kim Knull Psychologist and mother-of-two, Kim Knull says a vision problem left her normally happy and easy-going daughter exhausted and prone to temper tantrums. (Kim Knull/Facebook)

    “She’d come home really tired, even though it was a half a day … then in Grade One, she started to have some problems with her piano lessons — she wasn’t keeping up with other kids — and the same with reading. She didn’t seem to be progressing as well as the other children.”

    At first, it looked like a behaviour problem, said Knull, a former teacher.

    “But the other thing that we noticed was — especially the first two months of Grade One — she was coming home and having temper tantrums.”

    For Knull, seeing her usually-happy and compliant daughter exhausted and frustrated was a red flag.

    “That was not her style of communicating,” said Knull. “She’s not a temper tantrum kid.”

    Around the same time, Knull began to notice her daughter was not able to complete her eye exams at the doctor’s office — always failing when it came to the final line. At first, Knull thought it was a matter of learning the letters, but as her daughter moved into Grade Two, she realized that wasn’t the case.

    “By this year, she’s reading, so when she wasn’t able to do the line of letters, the optometrist … said ‘why don’t you get her vision assessed?'”

    Knull balked at first, since her daughter had 20/20 vision — but as she later learned, there is a lot more to vision than seeing things clearly.

    Eyes working independently lead to confusion

    “Being able to see 20/20 is a very important part of vision but that’s not the only skill,” says Yeung.

    “If you think about driving, you have to assess where all the cars are around you, you have to assess the speed you’re going, how fast the other cars are going, depth perception — all that stuff is all related.”

    Most children learn basic vision — which Yeung differentiates from sight — as babies, crawling and reaching for objects.

    However, some children have a vision problem that causes a disconnect between what’s on the page and how it’s interpreted by the brain, she said. As a result, words may appear to double, disappear or dance in front of their eyes.

    The brain then ends up spending more time trying to sort out the conflicting data at the expense of comprehending what’s actually going on in front of them.

    This can be a major problem in the classroom where up to 80 per cent of learning is visual, said Yeung, and lead to eye fatigue which can send a child looking for distraction. As a result, the condition is sometimes mistaken for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.

    Up to one in four children have a vision problem unrelated to simple sight, she said.

    “The biggest thing is that the kids don’t know that this isn’t a normal way of seeing, because they’ve only seen this way,” Yeung said.

    ‘I couldn’t believe the transformation’

    To find out how their children see the world, Yeung says parents should ask specific questions: ‘Are you seeing double? Are the letters and words moving on the page? Are things blurry around the edges?’

    Parents should also be on the lookout for red eyes and frequent headaches, she added. Likewise, be aware of how often your child rubs his or her eyes after looking closely at something, covers an eye, or tilts a page from side to side while reading.

    Once diagnosed, the problem can be treated using vision therapy — a weekly activity session designed to teach children how to use their vision more efficiently.

    “We work on eye-teaming skills, tracking, even processing and perceptual things, so we play a lot of games and puzzles,” she said. Those games can include jumping on a trampoline, throwing balls, tracking moving objects with their eyes.

    While anyone can benefit from practising their vision skills, the change can be dramatic among children who previously had problems relaying messages from their eyes to brain.

    “Part of my feeling terrible as a parent is that I had no idea how much this was impacting her until it started to get better,” said Knull of watching her own daughter’s recovery.

    “I couldn’t believe the transformation.”

    Since beginning vision training, Knull says her daughter’s reading fluency and compliance have both improved, as has her mood.

    “If I could have projected five or ten years out, I [used] to see her being one of those children who hated school, who would not want to go on to university because school was just so much work — but now, she’s got so much confidence … and she actually feels like she’s a smart kid.”

    The Alberta Association of Optometrists recommends children get an eye exam every year — even if they don’t appear to have any vision problems.

    Alberta Health covers the cost of annual eye exams for children and teens up to the age of 19.

  • April 10, 2015

    Marble game for Establishing Routines for Kids

    Have you ever wondered how to stop repeating yourself and nagging your children? Get them to practice routines! When something is done every day it becomes automatic! This is what my marble game looks like, but you can tailor it for your family! Start with a family discussion, and make it fun!  It is easy to forget to say “good job” or “thank you” to our children.  This helps!

    Routines: WAKE UP-1 marble -make bed -have breakfast -get dressed -brush teeth/hair

    LUNCH-1 marble -try one bite of everything on your plate -say “may I be excused” and “thank you for lunch” -put plate on counter

    AFTER SCHOOL-1 marble -put coat and shoes away -empty backpack -empty lunch kit -eat snack

    DINNER-1 marble -try one bite of everything on your plate -say “may I be excused” and “thank you for dinner” -put plate on the counter

    BED TIME-1 marble -snack -bath -pajamas -brush teeth -read

    Extra marbles awarded for kind acts or practicing piano, dance, reading a book.

    *try not to reward activities that they already enjoy doing

    TAKE AWAY 1 marble: Saying bad words like: poop, fart, bum Doing things like: kicking, hitting, complaining about dinner, not saying excuse me when you burp, sticking out tongue

    EARN WITH MARBLES: -ipad 10 minutes 2 marbles -playdate 5 marbles -birthday party 10 marbles

    “It’s pretty fun playing the marble game!  It is a good way for me to keep track of my bad talk!” -Emma, 5 yrs old

  • September 16, 2014

    Meditation for kids? You bet!

    There are times when life is stressful.  What can parents do to help their children cope?  It is suggested that meditation can help people connect their mind and body, becoming more present in the moment.  There are now meditations geared towards children that can help them self regulate and self sooth.  These skills of being mindful and paying attention can help in school, sports and social interactions!  Like any skill, it will come more naturally to some than others, but starting with a short duration can be helpful Parents can help children work their way up from a few seconds to a few minutes.  www.smilingmind.au will help make the whole experience fun!

    Listen to more on this from Kimberly Knull, Registered Psychologist

    http://www.cbc.ca/edmontonam/columnists/2014/09/02/parenting-column—childhood-meditation/

     

  • June 3, 2014

    Getting Kids to Do as You Ask

    Do you hear the word “NO” all the time?  Are you frustrated she your children will not follow your directions?  Perhaps the problem is when and how you ask.  Registered Psychologist Kimberly Knull gives tips on how to get the results you want when asking your kids to do something!

     

    http://www.cbc.ca/edmontonam/columnists/parenting-1/2014/05/27/parenting-column—getting-kids-to-do-as-you-ask/

  • February 5, 2014

    Being on Time With Children!

    Do you struggle getting out of the house?  Are mornings rushed and stressful?

    Hurry up, we’re late!  Is what many parents find themselves saying on a daily basis! For many families, the morning rush hour is the most stressful part of the day.  Here to give us tips on how to arrive on time, and perhaps even a little early, is Kim Knull.

    http://www.cbc.ca/player/Radio/Local+Shows/Alberta/ID/2434883700/

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